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A great webcam entry into the Master series

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A great webcam entry into the Master series

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Logitech’s MX lineup has been a reliable option for home and office users for a while, including useful peripherals like keyboards and mice. But there hasn’t been a webcam in the MX lineup until today, when Logitech announced the MX Brio 4K. It’s a spiritual successor to the Logitech Brio, which is the 4K webcam the company introduced back in 2017. Now firmly part of the MX lineup, the new MX Brio 4K has the build quality and premium feature set to match other MX products. That includes an aluminum build, a versatile mounting clip, and a larger camera sensor size.


I’ve been using the MX Brio for just over a week, and it’s a great webcam at the $200 price point. Considering that the seven-year-old Brio 4K remained at its $200 MSRP as of yesterday, you get a far better experience with the MX Brio for the same price. The larger sensor size adds detail and clarity that most users probably aren’t getting from their webcam, and the MX Brio excels at handling poor lighting conditions. On the software side, the webcam includes AI image enhancement that adjusts things like auto-exposure and auto white balance based on a user’s individual face. It’s also nice that the MX Brio works together with other MX products; for example, you can mute the webcam with your mouse.


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It isn’t all great, though. Some advanced features are nonexistent on the MX Brio, or are limited to the enterprise-only model. There’s also a total of four software programs that can be used to control the MX Brio. At some point, having this many options available simply creates a convoluted experience for users. However, this won’t be an issue for the right user. If you’re looking for a professional webcam for home or office uses, the MX Brio is an excellent choice — and it works better with other MX peripherals.

About this review: Logitech sent me the MX Brio webcam for review. It did not have input in this article, and did not see its contents before publishing.

MX-Brio

Logitech MX Brio 4K Webcam

Great business webcam

It makes the most out of subpar lighting situations

Logitech’s MX Brio 4K is the first-ever webcam in the company’s MX series. It builds upon the foundation of the Brio 4K, but adds a better sensor, camera housing, and feature set. This webcam is designed for mix-use in the home or office, and is made to be fairly portable. It’s pricey, at $200, but it isn’t the most expensive webcam on the block either.

Pros

  • It has a 4K, 8.5MP sensor with a physical privacy shutter
  • Using AI image enhancement, it can auto-adjust things like exposure and white balance
  • It works great with Logitech’s MX ecosystem
Cons

  • Software is split between four programs
  • Only the business variant gets automatic tracking
  • We wouldn’t recommend it as a portable webcam solution
  • No support for Windows 11 Hello

Pricing and availability

Logitech announced the MX Brio 4K webcam today, and it’ll start shipping sometime this month. It retails for $200 and can be found at Logitech’s website now, but the webcam will appear at third-party retailers soon. You can get the MX Brio in three colors: Pale Gray, Graphite, and Black. There’s also an enterprise version of the MX Brio, called the MX Brio 705 for Business, and it’s available for the same $200 price — but only via enterprise distribution channels.


Specs

Logitech MX Brio 4K Webcam

Resolution
4K

Wide Angle Lens
5-element wide angle glass lens

Connection
USB 3.0 (USB-C)

Integrated Lighting
No

Aperture
f/2.0

Frames per second
4K/30fps or 1080p/60fps

Mounting
Adjustable clip and adhesive

Compatibility
Windows 10 or later, macOS 10.15 or later, ChromeOS, Linux

Sensor size
8.5MP

Additional features
AF, AWB, Exposure, Focus, HDR,

Size (WxDxH)
98mm x 36mm x 44mm (webcam only)

Weight
137g (without clip), 176g (with clip)

Ports
USB-C

Design and mounting

It’s a bit heavy, but there’s adhesive to secure the webcam

The MX Brio will blend in with most home or office setups, but it is a fairly large webcam. The camera sensor is giant, but that’s part of the reason this webcam can offer great video quality. If you put the MX Brio next to the older Brio 4K, it would be hard to imagine that these two cameras retailed for the same price. Logitech’s newest webcam uses a mix of aluminum and plastic, but the build quality feels infinitely more premium than the Brio 4K. The latter used glossy plastic for the most part, while most of the MX Brio’s front is encased in aluminum.

If you put the MX Brio next to the older Brio 4K, it would be hard to imagine that these two cameras retailed for the same price.


The mounting clip is made of soft-touch plastic, and offers a lot of adjustability. There’s a small hinge that flips upward toward the user, which can be used to show a desk view. On the back, there’s a mounting clip that presses against a monitor to securely position the MX Brio. For added security, the clip has a strip of adhesive. It isn’t single-use, but I wouldn’t move it any more than you have to if you’re using the adhesive. The MX Brio attaches to the stand magnetically, making for easy removal.

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You can also unfold the mounting clip to use it as a stand. I tried positioning the MX Brio on a desk and atop my light bar, and both positions worked flawlessly. The adhesive strip is especially helpful if you’re placing the webcam on something that isn’t a standard monitor. The MX Brio webcam connects with one USB 3.0 cable, so it’s not difficult to move it from one monitor to another. However, it is fairly large, meaning that the MX Brio isn’t the most portable or the most apt for laptop use. For that, the StreamCam could be a better option.


Camera quality and performance

The MX Brio will almost certainly be an upgrade over your current webcam

The Logitech MX Brio is an excellent webcam for video calls because it pairs a great camera sensor with dual beamforming microphones. It provides the same 4K resolution as the older Brio 4K, and it’s still limited to 30 frames-per-second at that quality level. To record or stream at 60fps, you’ll need to drop the resolution down to 1080p. But the real upgrade is in the sensor itself, which is an 8MP Sony Starvis sensor. It’s a five-element, wide-angle glass lens featuring an f/2.0 aperture. All told, Logitech says that this sensor has a 70% larger pixel size than the Brio 4K.

The Logitech MX Brio is an excellent webcam for video calls because it pairs a great camera sensor with dual beamforming microphones.


This improved sensor adds detail and clarity to photos and videos, and the wide-angle lens allows you to crop into your image. That way, you can effectively “zoom” without a loss in quality. There’s no true optical zoom on the MX Brio, but you can choose between default FOVs of 90 degrees, 78 degrees, or 65 degrees. Further options are available in Logitech software, where users can manually control their webcam. However, Logitech officially recommends users stick to automatic mode for basic video calling and home office use, so we’ll review image quality as it is right out of the box first.

In the images above, you can see what photos from the MX Brio look like in normal lighting conditions. There are some challenges in this lighting situation, such as the lightstrip to the left of the frame and the overhead lighting in the back room. However, this situation represents how the Logitech MX Brio will perform with an abundance of light. The left image, captured by MX Brio, is clear and rich in detail. On the right, my M3 iMac’s inbuilt webcam is succumbing to light blur and distortion due to the conditions.


For the second set of images, I turned off all the lights in my apartment and turned my iMac’s brightness to its lowest setting. Here, you can see that the MX Brio photo is darker than the iMac photo. But the MX Brio still does a better job at retaining detail and preventing the light coming through the window blinds from blowing out the image. It’s an impressive result, considering you’d almost never replicate these conditions in a real-world scenario.

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The MX Brio gives you the best of both worlds when it comes to privacy. There’s a LED that shows when the camera is active, as well as a physical privacy shutter.

Software and customization

There are simply too many software programs for this webcam

The Logi Options+ software.


Software is a bit of a mixed bag while using the MX Brio, because the options are overwhelming. The good part about the MX Brio is that it’s certified for use with all the major video calling services. That includes Microsoft Teams, Zoom, and Google Meet. It’s also confirmed to work with WebEx, Skype, FaceTime, Streamlabs, and OBS. The webcam works on macOS, Windows, Chrome OS, and Linux. Put simply, compatibility won’t be an issue while using MX Brio. You’ll just need a computer with one of those operating systems and a USB 3.0 port to get started. The included cable is USB-C, but a USB 3.0 Type-A to Type-C cable will also work.

Software is a bit of a mixed bag while using the MX Brio, because the options are overwhelming.


The problem is that there are a total of four software tools from Logitech that control the MX Brio. There’s Logi Options+ and Logitech G-Hub on the consumer side, and Logitech Tune and Sync on the business side. Logitech tells MX users to go with Options+, gamers to go with G-Hub, and enterprise users to go with Tune or Sync. That’s great if you fall into one of those specific categories, but what if you want to use the MX Brio for multiple uses? The idea of using up to four apps to control one webcam does not sound fun.

I used pre-release versions of Logi Options+, so the final version of MX Brio software may be different than what you see below.


I used Options+ with the MX Brio, since that’s the application you use to control the entire MX ecosystem. It was generally a good experience, providing a fair bit of customization in a simple format. In the Options+ app, you can adjust the MX Brio’s FOV and change how the video feed is cropped. Notably, only the MX Brio 705 for Business supports RightSight, a feature that automatically keeps your face in frame. That’s disappointing, because premium webcams like the Obsbot Tiny 2 have this functionality available already, albeit at a higher price. AI-enabled features like face and head tracking will only become more common in the future, so it would’ve been nice to see them here.

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You can also adjust the color temperature and exposure compensation of the MX Brio with simple sliders. These features improved photo quality significantly in my testing, because it turned the blue-white hue of my images to a more natural looking shade. There are a lot of neat adjustment tricks in manual mode in the Options+ app. Even if you’re just using the webcam for video calls, it’s worth giving them a try.


The MX Brio works excellently with MX keyboards and mice due to the Options+ software. While in a video call, pressing the mute key on an MX Master keyboard will mute your camera’s audio. On an MX Master mouse, clicking the thumb buttons can mute your camera’s video or audio. It’s a nice touch that makes the MX Brio feel like it’s part of a bigger ecosystem of devices that work together.

Should you buy the MX Brio webcam?

You should buy the Logitech MX Brio webcam if:

  • You want a 4K webcam for home or office use, primarily for video calls
  • You value premium build quality and features, like a privacy shutter
  • You want a webcam that will fit in with your other MX products


You should NOT buy the Logitech MX Brio webcam if:

  • You need more advanced features, like automatic tracking
  • You want a webcam primarily for streaming
  • You want a webcam for your laptop

It’s been a while since Logitech made a new Brio webcam, seven years to be exact. The Logitech MX Brio serves as both a spiritual successor to the Brio 4K and a capable debut webcam in the MX series. Image quality is great, the customization features are solid, and the MX Brio generally just works. You can’t ask for much more from a webcam aimed at home and office use. While there are some areas left to improve, people looking for improved video call quality will get a good value out of the MX Brio for $200.

MX-Brio

Logitech MX Brio 4K Webcam

Great business webcam

It makes the most out of subpar lighting situations

Logitech’s MX Brio 4K is the first-ever webcam in the company’s MX series. It builds upon the foundation of the Brio 4K, but adds a better sensor, camera housing, and feature set. This webcam is designed for mix-use in the home or office, and is made to be fairly portable. It’s pricey, at $200, but it isn’t the most expensive webcam on the block either.

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