HomeLatest FeedsTechnology NewsNovel nanostructures for the production of electronic devices and hydrogen catalysis

Novel nanostructures for the production of electronic devices and hydrogen catalysis


Semiconductor materials are of fundamental importance in industry, especially in many areas of digitalization.

The researchers of the Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science (EK MFA) of the ELKH Energy Science Research Center are developing modern semiconductor materials and technologies with an emphasis on energy efficiency and sustainability within the framework of an ongoing Thematic Excellence Program. These materials and processes can be used in the production of more efficient light sources (LEDs) and electronic devices, as well as in the catalysis of the production of hydrogen from water.

Semiconductor materials are of fundamental importance in industry, especially in many areas of digitalization. A wide range of digital electronic devices, efficient light sources (LEDs) and sensors are based on semiconductor devices. In these areas, among others, the novel 2D nanostructures produced by EK MFA researchers can bring significant progress, which in the long term will enable the development of more efficient, faster, and less energy-demanding semiconductor devices.

2D quantum materials ‒ artificial crystals ‒ built up from 2D crystals atomically layer by layer form a new family of materials whose structure can be controlled to an extent unimaginable in the case of other materials. Observing and interpreting the new physical phenomena created in them enables the targeted production of new materials with designed electrical, optical or magnetic properties. The institute was the first in the world to observe the structure and composition of the self-organized molecular layer on the surface of various 2D crystals, including the semiconductor molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements at atomic resolution. The results make it possible to improve the operational stability of devices based on semiconductor 2D crystals under real conditions.

The researchers also developed a very simple process based on sputtering, which can be used to produce homogeneous yet thin MoS2. Esaki diode characteristics were measured by depositing 2D MoS2 (p+) on a single-crystal semiconductor, deliberately heavily doped silicon carbide (SiC) (n+). These can be used in devices suitable for amplification due to their negative differential resistance. Through the results, the operation of devices based on 2D crystals and the technical solutions that can be used to create electronic devices with small size, low material consumption and low energy consumption can be more precisely understood and planned.


EC MFA researchers have also made progress in the catalysis of the production of hydrogen from water, which is promising from the point of view of truly green production of hydrogen. They worked on the development of new and cheap, nanostructured catalysts, with the help of which the photo-electrochemical water splitting becomes efficient, if a co-catalyst that improves the interfacial reactivity is placed on a semiconductor. For this purpose, a simple iron-containing compound with a 3D nanopyramidal structure on bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) semiconductor was used. The goal of the development is to make the energy storage methods that come to the fore with the spread of solar panels more efficient.

The project number TKP2021-NKTA-05 will be implemented until the end of 2025 with the support provided by the Ministry of Culture and Innovation from the National Research, Development and Innovation Fund, financed by the TKP2021 tender program.

Mr.Mario
Mr.Mario
I am a tech enthusiast, cinema lover, and news follower. and i loved to be stay updated with the latest tech trends and developments. With a passion for cyber security, I continuously seeks new knowledge and enjoys learning new things.

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